Nursing School STudyTips

 This site is awesome with all of its resources..it has a really good test taking strategy article that gives you key words to look for that will help tell you if its a n implementaiton, assessment , diagnosis, planing or evaluation question and how to answer it. Her’es the link

http://www.nursereview.org/2007/07/how-to-choose-right-answer-using-adpie.html

Here’s just a quick brief teaser of the article:

Which part of the Nursing Process: Assessment; Analysis; Planning; Implementation or Evaluation?

Next, Decide the Order of Priority

First you must decide what part of the nursing process the question is connected with:

ANALYSIS – is the process of identifying potential and actual health problems. Most identify pertinent assessment information and assimilate it into the nursing diagnosis. Prioritize the needs that have been identified during analysis.

Some common words that are associated with ANALYSIS questions:
diagnose; contrast; compare; analyze; order; prioritize; define; classify; catagorize; synthesize; sort; arrange;

This link has an awesome collection of how to get through clinicals as well attached to it

Nursing Student Study Tips – NurseZone.

Study Tips

You’re a nursing student, you’ve read all of your course outlines, but when it comes to studying, you’re not sure where to start and you need some help-FAST. You’ve come to the right place. Whether you’re studying for exams, preparing for your first clinical rotation or seeking tools to simplify your workload and boost your comprehension, the Study Tips section of NurseZone offers helpful hints, study aids and useful tools and references to help get you started.

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Study Tips

You’re a nursing student, you’ve read all of your course outlines, but when it comes to studying, you’re not sure where to start and you need some help—FAST. You’ve come to the right place. Whether you’re studying for exams, preparing for your first clinical rotation or seeking tools to simplify your workload and boost your comprehension, the Study Tips section of NurseZone offers helpful hints, study aids and useful tools and references to help get you started.

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STUDY HALLCLINICAL ROTATION 101TOOLS OF THE TRADE

For some, there is nothing worse than studying for and taking tests. However, the process can be simplified using these valuable tips that will help you form solid study habits, create a method that works for you and to prepare you for exams.

Forming Study habits: 10 Ways to Simplify Your Nursing School Life
  1. Stick to the plan. Track all projects, deadlines, exams and other activities relating to work and/or school in a personal planner or a pocketbook calendar.
  2. Take notes. Place notes in outline format with headers, subheads and bullet points. Add items your lecturer refers to in the book.
  3. Create flashcards. A quick and easy way to quiz yourself right up until test day. Use flashcards for making a file of diseases/conditions and their treatments, listing signs and symptoms, diagnostic tests and interventions.
  4. Tape record. This is especially handy on “test review” days when instructors share what material is likely to appear on the exam. Remember to check with your instructor first!
  5. Compare notes. It’s possible that your classmates have information you didn’t catch and vice-versa.
  6. Use the textbook to your advantage. Outline each chapter, write down questions about concepts you don’t understand and refer to other resources for extra help (i.e. the Internet, nursing journals, NCLEX review materials, etc.).
  7. Stay informed. Attending class is important. You never know if a question asked by a fellow classmate or a piece of information not found in the book might be found on the next exam.
  8. Ask questions. Get answers to questions raised in your book, ideas you’re unclear on from lectures or clarify your notes.
  9. Stay in touch with your instructor. Visit during office hours, send an e-mail, talk by phone and sit in the front row during class whenever possible.
  10. Be exam prepared. Find out what the exam will cover and the exam format. Review points emphasized in class, questions in your study guides, past quizzes and end of chapter review sections.
Helpful Links for Forming Solid Study Habits

Study Skills: Tips From Former Nursing Students
Study Tips for Successful Distance Learning
Test Preparation and Test-taking Tips

Methods of Study
Studying Alone

If studying alone sounds boring, difficult or lonely, think again. The advantage of studying on your own is that you can do it on your own time without having to plan around the schedules of others.

These are some tips for studying alone:

  1. Decide what to study. This means figuring out what you’ll study, for how long and how many chapters, pages, problems or case studies you want to complete. Once you’ve set your “schedule,” stick to it.
  2. Complete difficult tasks first. If you’re a procrastinator, start with something simple and/or interesting to get you motivated and on task.
  3. Give yourself a break. Study for 50 minutes and then give yourself a 10 minute break. The break is a good time to stretch, relax or have a snack.
  4. Change scenery. Often, locking yourself up in your dorm or apartment makes it more difficult to study, especially if you’re studying in a room that’s less than neat. Get out and study at a coffee shop, the library or the park. You’re likely to concentrate better and get more done.
  5. Getting tired or bored? Put down what you’re doing and start on a different task or subject. Stop studying when you’re no longer being productive.
  6. Keep your schedule practical, flexible and realistic. Make time for socializing, studying and sleeping. If you’re someone with lots of time, develop good organizational skills. For those with an already busy schedule, re-establish your priorities so that you aren’t trying to do too much in too little time.
  7. Repetition, repetition, repetition. It’s true that practice makes perfect-read your notes several times over until you remember the important points.
  8. Get plenty of sleep. Pulling an all-nighter won’t help you if you’re mind turns to gelatin by the time you arrive for the exam. Instead, study until your usual bedtime, then plan to rise earlier than usual the next morning for last minute reviewing. You’ll find that your mind will be fresher and ready for testing. And don’t overcaffeinenate!
Studying in Groups

Don’t forget, two heads are better than one. If you’re not feeling too confident about a class or find it easier to learn by discussing study material, you may want join a study group. It’s a great way to share ideas and teach each other, but it can also be unproductive if discussion departs from organic chemistry to who’s dating whom. Here are some tips for getting the most out of your study group sessions:

  1. Three’s Company. The ideal size of a study group is three. The smaller your study group, the more it will help you and members be more efficient, thorough and productive. This also places each member in the leader position.
  2. Set goals. Each person should walk into a study session with a list of questions or goals to accomplish for that session. This will help keep the group on target and from wavering off the subject.
  3. Group effort. Assign a portion of each chapter or assignment to a member of your group. From there, make up study questions for your portion and distribute copies to the others. And voila, you have your own practice exam.
  4. No substitutions. Group study is not a substitute for individual learning and understanding. The key to learning is not the actual answer but the process of critical thinking.

Simplify your study time. Use drug dosage calculators, medical mnemonics, clinical drug databases, ABG and EKG tutorials, among other tools and resources to help you better understand what you’ve learned in lecture and read about in your textbooks.

Drug Dosage Calculators

Though most professors and teaching faculty will likely expect you to figure out drug conversions and dosage calculations the old fashioned way-using a pencil and paper-these calculators can be helpful for checking your work. Keep in mind that all calculations must be confirmed before using them and that suggested doses should not override clinical judgment:

Nursing calculators

Medical Mnemonics

Mnemonics, which simply means “memory aid” in Greek, is a quick and significant means to enhance your memorization skills. Unlike acronyms and other means of learning by association, using mnemonics is an effective way to remember hard-to-retain lists of facts. Check out these mnemonic aids:

World’s Database of Medical Mnemonics

Clinical Drug Databases

Not familiar with what prescriptive drugs are available? Use a clinical drug database. Though they vary in their offerings, you are likely to find that they provide information on up-to-date pharmaceuticals on the market, as well as off-label uses and dosages, herbal supplements and nutritional products. Some clinical drug databases also list new drugs on the market and drugs being tested. Here are a few databases to explore:

Infectious disease clinical drug downloads
Rx List

Arterial Blood Gases (ABGs)

Evaluating arterial blood gases (ABGs) means determining the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as the acidity of the blood shortly after it leaves the heart. Use these ABG online tutorial tools to help you assess the oxygen capacity of the lungs, the oxygen pressure in the blood, respiratory adequacy and acid-base balance:

General Information about ABGs

EKGs

With so many different types of cardia arrhythmias, learning what the electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) rhythms mean can be confusing. Use the following links to help you interpret, study and improve your ability to recognize EKGs:

The EKG Tutorial
Normal and Abnormal EKGs and Heart Sounds

Virtual Stethoscopes

Use these virtual stethoscope sites to help you decipher normal and abnormal cardiac and respiratory sounds:

Habits of the Heart
McGill University Virtual Stethoscope

Other References

Want to know more? Check out these general references for all of your study needs:

Free Health Care Data
MedicalMatrix
National Library of Medicine: Visible Human Project
Loyola University Medical Center: Structure of the Human
University of Washington Muscle Atlas

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Study Tips for Nursing Students

Being a nurse and teaching college in an allied health program, I am intimately aware of the large volume of information and new terms nursing students are faced with.  It is necessary to learn this material to be both successful in your college career and to give the best patient care upon graduation.  At times the amount of information fed to you each semester may seem insurmountable.  But it’s not – you’ll make it!   There are many different learning styles, but I am certain some of the following tips will apply to you and make your student life a bit easier! 

  • DON’T LOOK AHEAD:  The worst action you can take is to look ahead at ALL of the information you are going to need to learn over the course of this semester.  Focus on TODAY and what you need to know TODAY.  Don’t even look ahead in the book.  It will just make you feel anxious and overwhelmed.  You will be amazed at the end of the semester just how much material you covered. But do it in steps…

 

  • BREAK IT DOWN:  You have 30 pages of material to digest between now and next week.  Impossible!  No – not really…You have 5 days, right?  Read and study 6 pages per day.  Not only will you understand the material better this way, but you will retain it as well. 

 

  • INDEX CARDS:  Don’t underestimate the power of the index card.  Make flash cards with terms or concepts you are unfamiliar with. The time you spend making these cards is time well spent. You will be learning the term as you are writing it out, making a study tool for the next class, and preparing references ready to study for the midterm and final exams. 

 

  • ANXIETY IS CONTAGIOUS – DON’T CATCH IT:  If there is a student in your class who crams at the last minute for homework or tests (you know who I’m talking about here), please do not choose him/her as a study partner!  His/her lack of preparation and feelings of anxiety and hopelessness will rub off on you.  Don’t allow that to happen.  After all, you are working hard and are ready to go!

 

  • STUDY A LITTLE EACH DAY:  Even if you don’t have homework to do, or a particular set of materials to study, study anyway!  No…..I’m not kidding.  Go back over any material that was confusing or that you didn’t quite understand.  Again, by doing this you are going to retain the material longer, be better prepared for the next test, and more importantly be the best nurse for your patients!

 

  • ORGANIZE TO ENGERIZE:  I would bet you have more on your agenda today than studying – right?  Work and family commitments, as well as the invariable car breaking down incidents in your daily life, complicate things.  No problem!  Make a list of what you need to do each day.  Include errands, grocery items, phone calls, and of course what you are going to study that day!  Don’t beat yourself up if you don’t cover everything.  Make a list at the end of each day – include the things you didn’t get to today – for tomorrow.

 

  • ROME WAS NOT BUILT IN A DAY:  Your medical knowledge base will not be either! You can only do so much in one day.  Make the best use of that time but realize that you do not have to overwhelm yourself to get to where you want to go.  Stay focused, organized, chip away at you work a bit each day, and you will make it!

 

HAPPY STUDYING AND GOOD LUCK! 

 

Do you have any study tips of your own to share?  Leave a comment or visit our NCLEX Exam forum for advice or to share information with other nursing students.  

About the Author: Sue Heacock, RN, MBA, COHN-S and author of the recently published book – Inspiring the Inspirational: Words of Hope From Nurses to Nurses.  Sue is a Certified Occupational Health Nurse Specialist and has worked in a variety of areas of nursing including pediatrics and research.  Before entering the nursing profession, Sue worked in human resources and equal employment opportunity.  

 Click here to read more on Sue Heacock.

How to Study Guides for Nursing Students

By Deborah Dera, eHow Contributor
Study Guides for Nursing Students
Study Guides for Nursing Students
Flickr User: east_lothian_Museums

//

Even the best students find studying for nursing school exams to be a difficult task. The fast-paced, intense, and competitive environment within most nursing schools doesn’t make studying any easier. Properly preparing in advance will make studying for any nursing exam much easier. Follow these tips and you’ll be more than ready for that next nursing school exam.

//

Difficulty: Moderate

Instructions

Things You’ll Need:

  • Planner Notebooks Pens Pencils Highlighters
  1. 1

    Be organized. Studying is much easier when you have all of your materials in one place and when you have a clear outline of when assignments are due and exams will be held. Keep a planner that has all your deadlines listed, any materials you might need and any special tools that could make your study process easier.

  2. 2

    Take notes both while listening in class and while studying on your own. Your notes will serve to reinforce concepts in your mind. If writing out notes isn’t easy for you, try using a small digital recorder so that you can play back your notes while studying. You can either record your own notes or make a recording during your lectures. Make sure you ask your instructor for permission before recording a class–not all instructors allow students to do this.

  3. 3

    Use your textbooks. There’s no reason to spend hundreds of dollars on books you will never crack open. You paid for them; now use them. Outline your chapters and make notes on any points that aren’t crystal clear. Once you’ve made your initial outline you can use other resources, such as the internet, to find the answers to points that are still unclear. If all else fails, ask your instructor for additional help.

  4. 4

    Keep your study groups small. Groups of more than three or four people tend to be less productive than the smaller gatherings. Work together by dividing the workload evenly, making notes and creating questions to distribute to other members of your group. You’ll not only reinforce your own section, but the questions you create as a group will serve as an excellent practice test.

  5. 5

    Never cram the night before a test. You won’t remember what you studied and you’ll walk into your exam room feeling exhausted and unable to focus. Go to bed at your regular time and, if necessary, get up early for an extra hour or so of review time. Avoid caffeine the morning of your exam as well. A caffeine crash or craving during your exam will only serve as a distraction.

//

Memorize Entire Books – Guaranteed. There’s No Other Course Like This!

Fast & Easy Way to Learn Anatomy. Rich-media Videos and Cheat Sheets.

11 Month Full Time course in CA. Get started on your new career now!

with TABE 9&10, the premier adult basic skills assessment.

Ads by Google

Tips & Warnings

  • Forming good study habits early in your nursing school career will make your entire educational experience more productive. You’ll feel more confident in your skills and your ability to remember the information you’ve absorbed long after you’ve left the classroom setting.

Read more: How to Study Guides for Nursing Students | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4598412_study-guides-nursing-students.html#ixzz18EuwH200

 

How to Study Guides for Nursing Students

By Deborah Dera, eHow Contributor
Study Guides for Nursing Students
Study Guides for Nursing Students
Flickr User: east_lothian_Museums

//

Even the best students find studying for nursing school exams to be a difficult task. The fast-paced, intense, and competitive environment within most nursing schools doesn’t make studying any easier. Properly preparing in advance will make studying for any nursing exam much easier. Follow these tips and you’ll be more than ready for that next nursing school exam.

//

Difficulty: Moderate

Instructions

Things You’ll Need:

  • Planner Notebooks Pens Pencils Highlighters
  1. 1

    Be organized. Studying is much easier when you have all of your materials in one place and when you have a clear outline of when assignments are due and exams will be held. Keep a planner that has all your deadlines listed, any materials you might need and any special tools that could make your study process easier.

  2. 2

    Take notes both while listening in class and while studying on your own. Your notes will serve to reinforce concepts in your mind. If writing out notes isn’t easy for you, try using a small digital recorder so that you can play back your notes while studying. You can either record your own notes or make a recording during your lectures. Make sure you ask your instructor for permission before recording a class–not all instructors allow students to do this.

  3. 3

    Use your textbooks. There’s no reason to spend hundreds of dollars on books you will never crack open. You paid for them; now use them. Outline your chapters and make notes on any points that aren’t crystal clear. Once you’ve made your initial outline you can use other resources, such as the internet, to find the answers to points that are still unclear. If all else fails, ask your instructor for additional help.

  4. 4

    Keep your study groups small. Groups of more than three or four people tend to be less productive than the smaller gatherings. Work together by dividing the workload evenly, making notes and creating questions to distribute to other members of your group. You’ll not only reinforce your own section, but the questions you create as a group will serve as an excellent practice test.

  5. 5

    Never cram the night before a test. You won’t remember what you studied and you’ll walk into your exam room feeling exhausted and unable to focus. Go to bed at your regular time and, if necessary, get up early for an extra hour or so of review time. Avoid caffeine the morning of your exam as well. A caffeine crash or craving during your exam will only serve as a distraction.

//

Memorize Entire Books – Guaranteed. There’s No Other Course Like This!

Fast & Easy Way to Learn Anatomy. Rich-media Videos and Cheat Sheets.

11 Month Full Time course in CA. Get started on your new career now!

with TABE 9&10, the premier adult basic skills assessment.

Ads by Google

Tips & Warnings

  • Forming good study habits early in your nursing school career will make your entire educational experience more productive. You’ll feel more confident in your skills and your ability to remember the information you’ve absorbed long after you’ve left the classroom setting.

Read more: How to Study Guides for Nursing Students | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4598412_study-guides-nursing-students.html#ixzz18EuwH200

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